Friday, October 30, 2015

How to Create Lasting Success through the Power of Social Capital


People who build the right networks get the resources they need when they need them — entrepreneurs secure venture capital, investors find new business opportunities, job seekers locate good jobs, salespeople find new customers, managers boost their influence and effectiveness, business leaders tap the competitive advantage of human resources by building social capital as an organizational competence.
~ Wayne Baker
Anyone who keeps up with current affairs, knows there is a lot of volatility in many areas of society. These areas include, but are not limited to business, banking and real estate. One of my interests—connected to my personal Higher Purpose--is centered upon providing financial literacy to help reduce wealth disparity in the United States, particularly among youth and woman of color. My intent is to share my financial literacy curriculum that I designed to teach people how to build wealth. To this end, my focus is on home ownership and entrepreneurship.

My background is in system engineering and business consulting. I have applied the skills and knowledge that I have acquired in these two areas (over the past 25+ years), to create a systematic process for producing sustainability in the areas of home ownership and business creation.

My process for creating and maintaining this sustainability in both of these volatile areas is based on the strategy of leveraging the power of social capital that flows naturally through connected-engaged social networks.

Specifically my strategy calls for the following:

  • Promoting the four organizing principles of Conscious Capitalism
  • Creating businesses for the purpose of serving a higher purpose
  • Ensuring that all stakeholders benefit by partnering with community-based non-profit organizations
  • Connecting with other socially conscious individuals and organizations
  • Forming mastermind alliances with conscious leaders
  • Connecting social networks that in turn form conscious cultures

How? This is done by first acquiring social capital by serving others in a positive, measurable, impactful way. The most successful people know how to increase their wealth, health and happiness by tapping into the rich source of wealth hidden within social capital.

I’m sure many of you may be thinking “What is social capital?”

In his book Achieving Success Through Social Capital: Tapping the Hidden Resources in Your Personal and Business Networks, Professor Wayne Baker defines social capital as referring to the resources available in and through personal and business networks. These resources include information ideas, leads, business opportunities, financial capital, power and influence, emotional support, even goodwill, trust and cooperation.

Many people believe they should be able to get along just fine without social capital. They mistakenly believe that the “go it alone” strategy will bring them the success they are after. Nothing could be further from the truth.

In my next post, we will discuss How to Acquire Social Capital.

With Intent,
King

Thursday, October 22, 2015

Climbing the Stairs of Success



Faith is taking the first step even when you don't see the staircase.
~ Martin Luther King, Jr.
Business is all about taking one step at a time. We climb the staircase with faith that the next step we take will bring us closer to the goal. Sometimes we take a few steps back to regroup before we continue our ascent. But we always keep going. 

We know that if we keep going, stay faithful to our vision and intention, we will see light. There will be an open door at the top of the stairs. At that point, we need only enter inside the room.

What keeps you moving forward towards your own goals? Have you discovered and tapped into the power of your own higher purpose?

With Intent!
King

Thursday, October 15, 2015

Putting the “Co” in CEO




Some of the best businesses on the planet do not have a single CEO. They recognize that the complexity of the modern world requires deep collaboration, especially in the C-suite. Many conscious businesses now have Co-CEOs. They have Co-Founders. They have Co-Managing Directors.

To that end, I would like to announce our new
Co-CEO for Conscious Capitalism DC Chapter (DCCC), Willis Victory. Willis and I have formed not only a partnership this year but a true friendship. He is a man I admire and respect. We are aligned on our core values and higher purpose. As a successful investor and businessman, Willis brings a lot of horsepower to the table. Beyond that, he resonates fully with what we are doing in the DCCC. He is a big thinker (I love that). And he executes. He delivers. He makes things happen.

Here are a few things that Willis sees as he comes into the DCCC:

  • Expansion of Conscious Capitalism nationally and globally
  • Bringing in capital contribution’s, investor's, politicians, celebrity endorsements, athlete’s, musician’s and array of support
  • Upholding true capitalism
  • Building a hedge fund for conscious capitalism and an investing fund to invest in small businesses
  • Implementing a huge youth movement and programs for the youth to engage in to better prepare their financial future and other dreams that may be on their horizon
Together, with the leadership that Willis brings, the DCCC will be:
  • Hosting conferences (resort-like getaways) as Conscious Retreat’s
  • Expanding into media markets, film and television and also hosting some of the most prestigious events on the planet (we currently have Jennifer Lopez, Carlos Santana, Roberto Duran, Felix Trinindad, Victor Ortiz, Shakira, just to name a few)
  • Implementing influential strategic alliances
  • Building a platform for global trade within the organization
I am extremely honored to have Willis Victory as the Co-President of Conscious Capitalism DC Chapter. On behalf of all our members and supporters, I would like to welcome him to our organization.

The DCCC is a membership based society of business professionals, freethinking entrepreneurs, non-profits, lawmakers, and community leaders that are principle-centered and are driven by the desire to make a positive, measurable difference in the world. We are committed to the elevation of humanity through business by engaging in think tanks, mastermind session, strategic relationships, incubators, mentorship, and community empowerment events.

We are in the business of building business networks into a community of like-minded individuals who adhere to the Conscious Capitalist business model and operate from shared values. If you live in the DC area and have an interest in the DCCC organization, we would love to connect with you. Please visit our website for more information here.

With Intent!
King

Friday, October 2, 2015

Moving Towards True Stakeholder Orientation


We need to understand the complex interconnections between economic and social forces. Isolating "social issues" as separate from the economic impact which they have, and conversely isolating economic issues as if they had no social effect, misses the mark both managerially and intellectually. Actions aimed at one side will not address the concerns of the other. Processes, techniques and theories that do not consider all of these forces will fail to describe and predict the business world as it really is.
~ R. Edward Freeman
One of the things we do within the DC Chapter of Conscious Capitalism (DCCC) is present the four Principles of Conscious Capitalism Series for our members and invited guests. Each month the DCCC focuses an in depth discussion on one of the specific pillars of Conscious Capitalism. We define the principle and discuss best use cases using actual businesses as an example. We choose one or two companies that we believe does the best job of exhibiting the principle.

This month, we are focused on stakeholders. We will host a Panel Discussion on Implementing Stakeholder Orientation within businesses. So, you might ask, what is a stakeholder? Well, in the words of Dr. R. Edward Freeman (the father of the stakeholder approach), “A stakeholder in an organization is any group or individual who can affect or is affected by the achievement of the organization's objectives.”

Most businesses do not recognize that they have multiple stakeholders. They believe that the shareholder is the only stakeholder. This flawed assumption often leads to the many scandals that we have become accustomed to reading about over the past 20 or 30 years. The fact is, shareholders, employees, customers, suppliers, lenders and society are all stakeholders and must be treated as such. If one stakeholder is elevated at the expense of another, the business will suffer. I look forward to this event and reporting back on some of the insights that develop from our panel discussion.

The DCCC is a membership based society of business professionals, freethinking entrepreneurs, non-profits, lawmakers, and community leaders that are principle-centered and are driven by the desire to make a positive, measurable difference in the world. We are committed to the elevation of humanity through business by engaging in think tanks, mastermind session, strategic relationships, incubators, mentorship, and community empowerment events.

We are in the business of building business networks into a community of like-minded individuals who adhere to the Conscious Capitalist business model and operate from shared values. If you live in the DC area and have an interest in the DCCC organization, we would love to connect with you. Please visit our website for more information here.

With Intent!
King

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Being Early v. Being Late



Famous pivot stories are often failures but you don't need to fail before you pivot. All a pivot is is a change in strategy without a change in vision. Whenever entrepreneurs see a new way to achieve their vision - a way to be more successful - they have to remain nimble enough to take it.
~ Eric Ries
LinkedIn Founder Reid Hoffman is famous for saying that "If you’re not embarrassed by the first version of your product, you’ve launched too late." I love this bit of wisdom because it speaks to my personal philosophy of business. That is, you are either early or you are late. There is no such thing as “on time.”

To be successful now and in the future, you want to always be tinkering, always be trying out new things, and always be “poking the box” as Seth Godin says. The entrepreneur of the future is the person ready, willing and able to pivot based upon real world results.

We are all about elevating humanity through Conscious Capitalism. Let’s get busy taking action and let’s get real about what we see when we bring something new to market.

With Intent!
King

Thursday, September 24, 2015

Remembering Yogi



The great Yogi Berra passed away yesterday at the age of 90 of natural causes. Yogi was not only a professional baseball player in his time (and a manager and coach), he was also a great leader. In addition, he was also from my hometown of St. Louis, Missouri! 


To honor his life and the contribution he made, I want to include some of his more interesting quotes for your enjoyment (and to ponder upon). Here they are:
  • You better cut the pizza in four pieces because I'm not hungry enough to eat six.
  • Love is the most important thing in the world, but baseball is pretty good, too.
  • When you come to a fork in the road, take it.
  • Slump? I ain't in no slump... I just ain't hitting.
  • The future ain't what it used to be.
  • It was impossible to get a conversation going, everybody was talking too much.
  • I'm not going to buy my kids an encyclopedia. Let them walk to school like I did.
  • The towels were so thick there I could hardly close my suitcase.
  • I never said half the things I said.
  • It's like deja-vu, all over again.
  • Half the lies they tell about me aren't true.
  • Always go to other people's funerals, otherwise they won't come to yours.
With Intent!
King

Thursday, September 17, 2015

Fixing the Broken Window Pane


There is just no getting around that turning bad things into good things is up to you.
~ Deepak Chopra
A leader is the person who, whenever they see something that is not right, they do something about it. They do not wait for “the other guy” to fix it. They take action themselves. Rather than ignore the problem, they remedy the situation. We’ve all heard the argument about the broken window pane and where that leads us.

Think about how many little things we see each day that need attention. The spill on the floor, the copier machine that needs paper, the water cooler that has no water. These little things add up to big things unless they are handled. If we are not willing to take action on the little things, how will we ever be effective on the big things?

How often do you stop to pick up trash in the parking lot? Does your organization fix the broken window panes and reward those who are willing to step up into a leadership role?

With intent!
King